University of Oregon

Department of Art

Visting Artist Lecture Series: 2015-16

FALL 2015

October 8
Scott Reeder

October 15
Enrique Chagoya

October 22
Paula Wilson

October 29
Chris Coleman

November 12
Samantha Bittman

November 18*
Steven Matijcio
*A Wednesday lecture, in LA 177

November 19
Anders Ruhwald

WINTER 2016

January 14
Brian Bress

January 21
Martha Rosler
*to be held in LA 177

January 28
Lauren Fensterstock

February 4
Karyn Olivier

February 11
Squeak Carnwath

February 18
Liz Larner

February 25
Christian Patterson

 

SPRING 2016

March 30*
Aram Han Sifuentes
*A Wednesday lecture

May 2*
Rick Lowe
*A Monday lecture, 6:30pm, Lawrence Hall rm 177

 

 


 

Scott Reeder

It’s All In My Head

Thursday, October 8, 2015 

Slow Fade, 
2013, 
acrylic on canvas, 
20 x 16 inches
Slow Fade, 
2013, 
acrylic on canvas, 
20 x 16 inches 
Photo credit: Joshua Lott for The New York TimesPhoto credit: Joshua Lott for The New York Times

Scott Reeder’s paintings, sculptures and videos are studies in contradiction- abstract and representative, ambitious and restrained, ironic and sincere. His “pasta paintings” with their loopy variant marks, reference Abstract Expressionism, but are made with the elaborate alphabet of noodle types, and his text paintings, pairs of four-letter words like “Post Cats,” and “Dark Math,” channel Ed Ruscha via a lo-fi punk aesthetic. His list paintings, such as “Alternate Titles For Recent Exhibitions I’ve Seen,” are comical blends of topical mundanity and absurdist existentialism.

Scott Reeder is a painter, filmmaker and professor of painting and drawing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He currently lives and works in Detroit, Michigan. Reeder was the subject of a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago in 2011 and has been included in group exhibitions at the Tate Modern, London; the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; and the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art. Reeder’s work is included in the collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.; The Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta; and the Kadist Foundation, Paris.

In 2014, Reeder debuted his first feature-length film project, Moon Dust at Anthology Film Archive in New York. Reeder has also curated several exhibitions, including Dark Fair at the Swiss Institute NY, The Early Show at White Columns, NY and Drunk vs. Stoned (parts 1 & 2) at Gavin Brown's enterprise NY. Reeder is represented by Lisa Cooley in New York, NY, Kavi Gupta Gallery in Chicago, IL, and Luce Gallery in Turin, Italy.

kavigupta.com/artist/scottreeder

lisa-cooley.com/artists/scott-reeder

Watch lecture video here


Enrique Chagoya

Cannibal Palimpsest

Thursday, October 15, 2015 

Detail from La Bestia's Guide to the Birth of the Cool, 2014
Detail from La Bestia's Guide to the Birth of the Cool, 2014, ten color lithograph with chine-collé and gold metallic powder on handmade Amate paper, published by Shark’s Ink, edition 13/30, Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer
Enrique Chagoya
Photo credit: Kara Maria

Enrique Chagoya is a painter, printmaker, and art practice professor at Stanford's Department of Art and Art History. Enrique Chagoya uses art to turn assumptions, both artistic and political, on their heads. Drawing from his experiences living on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border in the late 70’s, and also in Europe in the late 90’s, Enrique Chagoya juxtaposes secular, popular, and religious symbols in order to address the ongoing cultural clash between the United States, Latin America and the world as well. He uses familiar pop icons to create deceptively friendly points of entry for the discussion of complex issues. Through these seemingly harmless characters Chagoya examines the recurring subject of colonialism and oppression that continues to riddle contemporary American foreign policy.

Chagoya was born and raised in Mexico City. He earned a BFA in printmaking at the San Francisco Art Institute and a MA and a MFA at the University of California, Berkeley. Chagoya has exhibited his work nationally and internationally for over two decades with a major retrospective organized by the Des Moines Art Center in Iowa in 2007 that traveled to UC Berkeley Art Museum and to the Palms Spring Art Museum in 2008. In 2013, a major survey of his work opened in Centro Museum ARTIUM in Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain that travelled to the Centro Atlantico de Arte Moderno in the Canary Islands in 2015. In 2014, he opened a print retrospective at the Elaine L. Jacob Gallery at Wayne State University in Detroit and in 2015, a print survey opened at the Instituto de Artes Graficas de Oaxaca in Oaxaca City, Mexico.

His work is in many public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum, and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco among others. He has been recipient of numerous awards including two NEA artists’ fellowships, the National Academy of Arts and Letters in New York, residencies at Giverny and Cite Internationale des Arts in France, and a Tiffany fellowship. He is represented by Gallery Paule Anglim in San Francisco, George Adams Gallery in New York, and Lisa Sette Gallery in Scottsdale, Arizona. His prints are published by in California by Electric Works in San Francisco, Magnolia Editions in Oakland, and Trillium press in Brisbaine, Made in California in Oakland, and Smith Andersen Editions in Palo Alto, and also in ULAE in Bay Shore, New York; Shark’s Ink in Lyons, Colorado; and Segura Publishing in Pueblo, Arizona.

This lecture and the exhibition “Enrique Chagoya: Adventures of Modernist Cannibals”—on view through December 06, 2015 in the Harold and Arlene Schnitzer Gallery at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art—are made possible with generous support from Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation. 

enriquechagoya.com

 

Watch lecture video here


Paula Wilson

Mooning

Thursday, October 22, 2015 

Stain Glass Booty, 2014, acrylic on muslin with bent birch support, 32 x 20 inches
Stain Glass Booty, 2014, acrylic on muslin with bent birch support, 32 x 20 inches.  Photo credit: courtesy of the artist
Paula WilsonPaula Wilson

Paula Wilson’s work blends multimedia and multi-cultural references in creating extravagant paintings, prints, videos, and sculptures that are simultaneously realistic and unworldly. The dense layering of color, image, pattern, and material in her pieces act as a visual metaphor for the complex stratum of histories and cultures that inform the work. With a style characterized by narrative, bold color, and silhouette, the work often depicts interactions between female figures and lush, highly detailed scenes of nature. Interweaving corporeal forms and patterns of bright color with literal and figurative reference to stain-glass windows and fabrics, Wilson’s work uses decorative motifs to great effect exploring both the nature of femininity as construct and the visual markers of identity.

Paula Wilson received a MFA from Columbia University in 2005 and has since been featured in group and solo exhibitions in the United States and Europe, including the Studio Museum in Harlem, Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Bellwether Gallery, Fred Snitzer Gallery, The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Center for Contemporary Art Santa Fe, Johan Berggren Gallery in Sweden, and Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw. Wilson is a recipient of numerous grants and awards including a Joan Mitchell Artist Grant, Art Production Fund’s P3Studio Artist-in-Residency at the Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas, and the Bob and Happy Doran Fellowship at Yale University. She lives and works in Carrizozo, New Mexico.

paulajwilson.com

 

Watch lecture video here


Chris Coleman

Emerging Terrains

Thursday, October 29, 2015 

 

“I believe in using art to create disruptions from daily life. Sometimes these disruptions are subtle, and sometimes enveloping. My art is always looking outward, unearthing the problematic and seeking possible pathways for positive forward movement. The question becomes how do I apply my digital media creation, creative coding, mechanical engineering, and sculptural skills towards answering challenges we face? How do the outcomes interrogate big picture perspectives and offer ways forward that are on some level practical? These are the challenges of the Critical Arts Engineer. The Critical Arts Engineer must have a deep understanding of many technological tools and methods of making, combined with a very critical look at what those tools offer, how they shape what is produced, and how they convey particular concepts; the concepts themselves being critical looks at our world in structural, political, and systemic terms.” – Chris Coleman

 

Chris Coleman was born in West Virginia, and he received an MFA from SUNY Buffalo, New York. His work includes sculptures, videos, creative coding and interactive installations. Coleman has had his work in exhibitions and festivals in more than 20 countries including Brazil, Argentina, Singapore, Finland, the U.A.E., Italy, Germany, France, China, the UK, Latvia, and across North America. His open source software project developed with Ali Momeni, called Maxuino, has been downloaded more than 50,000 times by users in over 120 countries and is used globally in physical computing classrooms. He currently resides in Denver, Colorado and is an Associate Professor and the Director of Emergent Digital Practices at the University of Denver.

digitalcoleman.com

Watch lecture video here


Samantha Bittman

Material Data

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Untitled, 2015, acrylic on hand-woven textile, 30 x 25 inches
Untitled, 2015, acrylic on hand-woven textile, 30 x 25 inches
Samantha Bittman
Samantha Bittman

In her paintings on hand-woven textile, Bittman exploits the limitations of the basic floor loom. By designing and executing weave drafts that consist of simple sets of numerically based instructions, she generates woven cloth whereby the architecture of the weave interlacements and the graphics of the cloth are one in the same. Once stretched over traditional painting stretcher bars, the textile patterns, which often become distorted by the act of stretching, direct and dictate the painted surface. These moves are both intuitive and logical. In several works, the weave graphics are replicated precisely in paint, negating the materiality of the textile in favor of the pictorial aspects of the cloth. In other instances, selectively painted areas merge with their underlying textile support, further flattening the picture plane and perceptually disorienting the viewer. 

Samantha Bittman lives and works in Chicago, Illinois. She received a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2004 and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2010 and also attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2011. Recent solo exhibitions include Razzle Dazzle at Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago, IL; Number Cruncher at Longhouse Projects, New York, NY; and Soft Counting, at Greenpoint Terminal, Brooklyn, NY. Bittman has been included in recent group exhibitions at Morgan Lehman Gallery, New York, NY; David Castillo Gallery, Miami, FL; Guerrero Gallery, San Francisco, CA; and Paris London Hong Kong, Chicago, IL. She is currently on faculty at the Rhode Island School of Design.

samanthabittman.com

Sponsored by the UO Department of Art, Mrs. Carol Reinhold and Mr. B. Terry Reinhold, and the Reinhold Foundation.

Watch lecture video here


Steven Maticjio

"Based on a True Story: Misbehaving Memory"

Connective Conversations | Inside Oregon Art 2015-2016 

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 in LA 177

Steven Matijcio

 

Steven Matijcio is the curator of the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. Prior to this position he served as Curator of Contemporary Art at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Matijcio received a MA from the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, New York and a HBA from the University of Toronto. He has held positions in a number of important galleries and museums including the Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art, the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the National Gallery of Canada

Matijcio was honored in 2010 with a prestigious Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award for his project paperless. In the summer of 2011 he was chosen from an international pool of candidates to participate in curatorial residencies in Gwangju, South Korea as part of the Gwangju Design Biennale and Berlin, Germany as part of the Haus der Kulturen der Welt’s SYNAPSE project exploring the relationship between art & science. In the fall of 2012 he curated the 4th edition of the Narracje Festival in Gdansk, Poland, which involved a citywide program of installations, interventions and video projections upon historic buildings. Matijcio’s 2013 essay “Nothing to See Here: The Denial of Vision in Media Art” was accepted into the RENEW: Media Art Histories Conference in Riga, Latvia.

Matijcio has also lectured on theory and criticism at the University of Manitoba, written for numerous catalogs and journals including the Guide to the 27th Sao Paulo Bienal, and was commissioned in 2003 by the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation to curate one of their first online exhibitions. He has recently sat on juries for the Tremaine Foundation, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the McKnight Fellowships in Minneapolis. 

This lecture is made possible by the a partnership with the University of Oregon School of Architecture and Allied Arts and The Ford Family Foundation’s Visual Arts Program Curators and Critics Tours and Lectures program Connective Conversations: Inside Oregon Art 2015-16 Season.

contemporaryartscenter.org

 

Watch lecture video here


Anders Ruhwald

Thinking Through Spaces: Objects and Site

Thursday, November 19, 2015

The School of the Flower, 2013, glazed earthenware and steel
The School of the Flower, 2013, glazed earthenware and steel, 36 7/8 x 68 x 20 inches
Anders RuhwaldAnders Ruhwald

Anders Ruhwald is one of the foremost ceramic artists working in the world today. Noted for large-scale installations that explore ceramic as both idea and material, he brushes aside the distinction between 'art' and 'craft', emphasizing instead the disruptive and transformative capacity of objects in space. As the Director of New York's Museum of Arts and Design Glenn Adamson has stated: “For all their compressed particularity, [his] sculptures are also enlivened by inexhaustible nuance. Ruhwald takes seriously the idea that surface is where form interfaces with spatial context, so his surfaces have an intensity in all registers.”

Anders Ruhwald is Artist-in-Residence and Head of Department at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. He graduated from the Royal College of Art in London in 2005. Solo exhibitions include “The Anatomy of a Home” at The Saarinen House in Michigan, “You in Between” at Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art in the United Kingdom, and more than 25 gallery and museum solo shows in New York, London, Paris, Hong Kong, San Francisco, Chicago, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Brussels as well as more than 100 group-exhibitions around the world.  His work is represented in over 20 public collections internationally including The Victoria and Albert Museum, United Kingdom, Musée des Arts décoratifs, France; The Denver Art Museum, The Detroit Institute of Art, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Icheon World Ceramic Center, Republic of South Korea; The British Crafts Council and The National Museum, Sweden. In 2011, he was awarded the Gold Prize at the Icheon International Ceramics Biennale in South Korea, in 2010 he received a Danish Art Foundation three-year work-stipend, and in 2007 he received the Sotheby’s Prize, United Kingdom. His work has been reviewed in major publications including the Guardian, Wallpaper, Artforum.com, Sculpture Magazine, and Avenuel.  Ruhwald has lectured and taught at universities and colleges around Europe and North America and has held an associate professorship at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

Sponsored in-part by the Robert James Ceramic Endowment.

ruhwald.net

 

 

Watch lecture video here


Brian Bress

Video is a Container

Thursday, January 14, 2016


Whitewalker 2, 2012, High definition single-channel video (color), high definition monitor and player, wall mount, framed, 61 x 37 x 4 inches, 4 min., 32 sec., loop
Photo Credit: Sarah Benedict

Brian Bress, a Los Angeles-based artist and filmmaker, creates absurd, circularly narrative films driven by the circumstances of a bizarre cast of ridiculously costumed characters, more often than not played by Bress himself. Though they rely predominantly on homemade props and costumes, Bress’s videos are visually innovative and their inherent silliness and rambling pace only serve to intensify the examination of assumptions about the nature of reality. He is also known for his collage-like portraits that feature costumed actors wearing strange masks that obscure their faces. By disguising the identities of the sitters, Bress heightens the level of uncertainty in the work to humorous levels. For his lecture at UO, Brian Bress unpacks 10 years of navigating the agenda of painting through the medium of photography and video.

Brian received a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design and a MFA from University of California, Los Angeles. His collages, photographs, videos and paintings have been exhibited in various group shows and film festivals in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York, including Spike and Mike’s Festival of Animation, Black Maria Film Festival, New York Director’s Club Biennial and The LA Weekly Biennial. Current and upcoming solo exhibitions include a ten-year retrospective at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt Lake City and the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver in 2016. Bress has recently had solo exhibitions and projects at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CA; Museo d’arte contemporanea, Rome, Italy; Santa Barbara Museum of Art, CA; and New Museum, New York, NY. Brian is represented by Cherry and Martin.

brianbress.com

Watch lecture video here


Martha Rosler

George and Matilda Fowler Lecture

"In the Place of the Public: Where Art Resides in Contemporary Society"

Thursday, January 21, 2015


Cleaning the Drapes, from the series “House Beautiful: Bringing the War Home" (1967–72).
Photo: via MoMA.​

Martha Rosler

Martha Rosler is an artist, theorist, and educator as well as a leading contemporary critical voice within feminist and art discourses. Rosler’s work encompasses photography, video, installation, photomontage, and performance as well as commentaries on art—especially on documentary photography— and culture. She was born in Brooklyn, New York, USA, where she lives and works.

Rosler’s work has been shown internationally for many years and in 1999-2001 was the subject of a retrospective, “Positions in the Life World,” at five European and two American museums; a more recent survey show was held at the Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Torino. Her collection of over seven thousand books toured internationally as the Martha Rosler Library. Rosler has been the recipient of a number of national and international awards, most recently The New Foundation Seattle’s inaugural lifetime achievement award.

Rosler has also published over fifteen books of her works and essays exploring the role of photography and art, public space, and transportation, as well as public housing and homelessness. Her essays have been collected as Decoys and Disruptions: Selected Writings, 1975-2001. Her most recent book is Culture Class, published in 2013 by e-flux and Sternberg Press (Berlin), which includes an extended essay on the role of artists in processes of gentrification.

Her widely seen video work Semiotics of the Kitchen (1975), reflecting her longstanding interest in the position of the female subject within patriarchy, uses humor in this parody of cooking shows to address the implications of traditional female roles. Other videos cover the geopolitics of food, mass-media imagery and language, war and torture, and domestic life.

Her groundbreaking work The Bowery in two inadequate descriptive systems (1974/75), in which photographs of storefronts are paired with metaphors for drunks and drunkenness, questions the social meaning of documentary essays centered on poor and destitute people.

Rosler is well known for her photomontages combining news photography with depictions of ideal homes and perfect bodies, producing a single frame as a way of highlighting the false disconnection between two public discourses. In the series “Body Beautiful, or Beauty Knows No Pain,” made between 1965 and 1972, Rosler deconstructs commercial representations of women and families in mass circulation magazines – for example, by augmenting images of lingerie models with snippets of pornographic imagery, whether from soft-core or hard-core sources. In “House Beautiful: Bringing the War Home (1967–72)”, a series of works produced at the peak of the Vietnam War, Rosler combined images of Vietnamese civilians and U.S. soldiers with those of pristine dwellings. These works remained outside the art context for many years, as Rosler distributed them as photocopies among the anti-war community as well as publishing them in “underground” periodicals. She reopened this series in 2004 and 2008, pointedly using the same form to draw a parallel between the Iraq and Afghanistan military adventures, begun by President Bush and his allies, and the dismal catastrophe of Vietnam begun four decades earlier.

Some of her best-known works deal with the geopolitical dilemmas of dispossession and entitlement. Interested in places of passage, she has produced photographic series on roads and shop windows, and large-scale installations about airports. “If You Lived Here” is her highly influential cycle of three shows and four public forums on housing, homelessness, and the built environment, held in New York in 1989 and reprised many times in various forms over the years. The accompanying book, in print since 1990, is in wide use as a textbook for architecture students.

Her current exhibitions include Greenpoint New Fronts in Berlin. In January her show at the New Foundation Seattle, Housing Is a Human Right, opens a year-long series of exhibitions and events on that theme.

This lecture is made possible by the George and Matilda Fowler Endowment Fund.

martharosler.net

 

Watch lecture video here


Lauren Fensterstock

Recent Work and Research

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Grotto, 2014, mixed media, dimensions variable
Grotto, 2014, mixed media, dimensions variable
Lauren Fensterstock, photo credit: Greta RybusPhoto credit: Greta Rybus

Lauren Fensterstock is an artist, writer, and curator based in Portland, Maine. Her work is held in private and public collections in the US, Europe, and Asia and has been the subject of numerous exhibitions including recent shows at The John Michael Kohler Art Center, The Contemporary Austin, The Pearlstein Gallery at Drexel University, and The Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Outside the studio, Fensterstock currently serves as a Critic at the Rhode Island School of Design. She previously served as Academic Program Director of the Interdisciplinary MFA in Studio Arts at Maine College of Art and as Director of the Institute of Contemporary Art at Maine College of Art. Her curatorial projects and published writings have been featured internationally. Fensterstock received a BFA from the Parsons School of Design and a MFA from SUNY New Paltz.

In an illustrated lecture, Lauren Fensterstock will share the motivations and research behind her recent work. Known for her intricately hand-cut paper installations, Fensterstock weaves together historical references spanning the Baroque, the Picturesque, Minimalism, and the decorative arts to explore the history of nature.

laurenfensterstock.com

Watch lecture video here


Karyn Olivier

Eye around Matter

Thursday, Febraury 4, 2016

Installation view of X and 6 at the Art Institute of Chicago, 2015. Photo credit: Clare Britt
Doubleslide, 2006, photo credit: Ryan Messina 
Karyn OlivierKaryn Olivier

“The subject of my talk will be centered on my artistic practice, which explores our relationship to everyday objects and spaces. I will discuss my use of conflicting histories, memories, narratives and identities to confound and question presumed knowns. The talk will also address my manipulation and reinterpretation of art historical movements such as minimalism and examine how my work attempts to wrestle and collapse the past with the present. I will discuss my use of ‘blind spots’— the under-considered spaces we occupy as sites for activation. These sites aim to be democratic, granting agency to anyone who acknowledges this potential and decides to claim it. I will discuss my Caribbean ancestry in relationship to several projects, which address the collective experience of the diaspora as well as personal narratives and memories from my birth country.” - Karyn Olivier

Karyn Olivier, who was born in Trinidad and Tobago, received a MFA at Cranbrook Academy of Art and a BA at Dartmouth College. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including exhibitions at the Gwangju and Busan Biennials, Korea; World Festival of Black Arts and Culture, Dakar, Senegal; the Wanas Foundation, Sweden; The Studio Museum, Harlem; The Whitney Museum of Art, New York; MoMA P.S.1, Long Island City; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; The Mattress Factory and Sculpture Center, Pittsburgh. In 2015 Olivier was commissioned to create public works for Creative Time in Central Park, New York and NYC’s Percent for Art Program. She is the recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, the Joan Mitchell Foundation Award, the New York Foundation for the Arts Award, a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, the William H. Johnson Prize, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Biennial Award and a Creative Capital Foundation grant. Olivier is currently an associate professor of sculpture at Tyler School of Art.

karynolivier.com

 

Watch lecture video here


Squeak Carnwath

In Conversation with Squeak Carnwath

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Hot Water (2), 1982, arc en ciel on paper, 30 x 22 inches. Photo Credit: M. Lee Fatherree
Hot Water (2), 1982, arc en ciel on paper, 30 x 22 inches. Photo Credit: M. Lee Fatherree
Carnwath, Photo credit: Peg SkorpinkskiPhoto Credit: Peg Skorpinkski

“My paintings and prints draw upon the philosophical and mundane experiences of daily life to form lush fields of color combined with text, patterns, and identifiable images. My vocabulary is a personal one, but one that is accessible to a wide range of people. I am interested in our collective and individual responses to representation and memory. They also act as a record of my daily struggles, fears, and moments of clarity.”- Squeak Carnwath

Leah Levy wrote in Squeak Carnwath: Transformations, in Lists, Observations, & Counting- “The subjects of Carnwath’s works are the simple intimacies and subtle intricacies of life: modest objects that portend significance; the interrelationships of humans and other living beings; emotions and perceptions; and the element of time itself. In its exploration, Carnwath’s art emphasizes the way our lives are organized in and about the daily minutia that tend to echo a broader envisioning of space and time.”

Squeak has received numerous awards including the Society for the Encouragement of Contemporary Art Award from San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, two Individual Artist Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Award for Individual Artists from the Flintridge Foundation. Carnwath is Professor Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley. Publications featuring Carnwath’s work include: Squeak Carnwath: Lists, Observations, & Counting (1996); Squeak Carnwath: Painting is no Ordinary Object (2009); and Horizons on Fire: Works on Paper 1979-2013 (2014). Carnwath is a founding member and current president of the Artists’ Legacy Foundation. She lives and works in Oakland, CA.

This lecture is funded in-part by a JSMA Academic Support grant in conjunction with the JSMA exhibition "Everyday is Not the Same: Squeak Carnwath's Prints and Papers" in the Artist Project Space from February 6 – April 10, 2016.

squeakcarnwath.com

Watch lecture video here


Liz Larner

Davis Lecture

Thursday, Febraury 18, 2016

Installation view of X and 6 at the Art Institute of Chicago, 2015. Photo credit: Clare Britt
Installation view of X and 6 at the Art Institute of Chicago, 2015. Photo credit: Clare Britt
Liz LarnerLiz Larner

“I began showing my work in 1985 and have always been interested in the meaning inherent in materials, as well as the linguistic implications of what something is called, which my art has often exposed the difference between. I am currently using more traditional art materials like paper, ceramics, paint, and wood but have also, and continue to use landscape materials bacteria and more contemporary means of facture like digital modeling and production. I feel the material is often the message, but the message is configured by form. Color has been an important aspect of what I do, and have done, and I use it to basically destabilize, dematerialize, and question the validity of the symbolic and semiotic aspects of my art. I am a female artist and my work reflects this.” – Liz Larner

Liz Larner received a BFA from the CalArts in 1985. She lives and works in Los Angeles. Larner has been the subject of numerous solo museum exhibitions, including a forthcoming exhibition at the Aspen Art Museum, 2015; the Art Institute of Chicago, 2015; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 2001-02; the Museum of Applied Arts Vienna, Austria, 1998; and Kunsthalle Basel, Switzerland, 1997. She has been commissioned for multiple public artworks including the Byron G. Rogers Federal Building and Courthouse Plaza, Denver, 2015; University of California, San Francisco, Mission Bay Project, 2003; and the Riverside Pedestrian Bridge at Walt Disney Studios, Burbank, 2000. She has been the recipient of multiple awards including the Nancy Graves Foundation Grant, 2014; Smithsonian American Art Museum Lucelia Artist Award, 2002; and the Guggenheim Fellowship, 1999. Larner is represented by Regen Projects in Los Angeles, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery in New York, the Modern Institute in Glasgow, Scotland and Max Hetzler Gallery in Berlin.

This lecture is made possible by the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Gay and Judi Davis and the Davis Family Endowed Fund in Art.

regenprojects.com/artists/liz-larner/

 

Watch lecture video here


Christian Patterson

Playing with Photography, Narrative, and the Book

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Prairie Grass Leak, 2009, Archival inkjet print, 8 x 10 inches
Prairie Grass Leak, 2009, Archival inkjet print, 8 x 10 inches 
Christian Patterson, photo credit: Kelly Anderson-StaleyPhoto credit: Keliy Anderson-Staley

Christian Patterson was born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin and lives in New York, New York. Photographs are the heart of his work and are sometimes accompanied by drawings, paintings or objects. His work “Redheaded Peckerwood” was published by MACK in 2011 to critical acclaim, won the 2012 Recontres d’Arles Author Book Award and is now in its third printing. In 2013, he was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. In 2015 Walther König will publish his work Bottom of the Lake. Patterson is self-taught but lectures widely about his work. He is represented by Rose Gallery in Santa Monica and Robert Morat in Hamburg and Berlin. Patterson will discuss his work process from concept to creation to presentation with special attention on the book form. 

christianpatterson.com

 

Watch lecture video here


Aram Han Sifuentes

Reinhold Foundation Visiting Professional Lecture

Embroidery in Translation: Globalization at the End of the Needle

Wednesday, March 30, 2016


Martha Ruiz Lopez's (from San Juan Chamula in Chiapas, Mexico) response to Korean Rank Badge, Joseon dynasty. Image Credit: courtesy of the artist Photo Credit: Roberto Sifuentes. 

Aram Han Sifuentes considers the complex impact of globalization and how it speaks through the end of the needle in the hands of immigrant laborers in and outside the garment industry, and artisans active in living textile traditions around the world. She will talk about her projects Amend: A Collection of Scraps from Local Seamstresses and Tailors (2011-2013), US Citizenship Test Sampler (2013-present), and Embroidery in Translation: Indigenous Chapanecan Artists Reinterpret Traditional Korean Textiles (2015-2016), which address themes of immigrant labor, immigration policy, citizenship, expressing one’s Americanness, embroidery as language and literacy, and skill sharing and exchange.

Aram Han Sifuentes learned how to sew when she was 6 years old from her seamstress mother. Han Sifuentes was born in Seoul, South Korea and immigrated to Modesto, California as a child. She mines from her family’s immigration experience to address issues of labor and explores identity as a first generation immigrant. 

Han Sifuentes’s work has been shown in national and international exhibitions. Her work has been included in exhibitions at the Chung Young Yang Embroidery Museum in Seoul, South Korea; Wing Luke Museum of Asian Pacific American Experience in Seattle, WA; Center for Craft, Creativity and Design in Asheville, NC; and Elmhurst Art Museum in Elmhurst, IL. She earned a BA in Art and Latin American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008 and a MFA in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013.

www.aramhan.com 

This lecture is sponsored by the UO Department of Art, Mrs. Carol Reinhold and Mr. B. Terry Reinhold, and the Reinhold Foundation.

 

Watch lecture video here


Rick Lowe

“Art and The Social Context”

Monday, May 2, 2016 at 6:30 p.m., Lawrence Hall rm 177


Sam Durant's installation, “We Are the People,” on view at Project Row Houses
Photo credit: John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

This lecture will illustrate the process of social engagement that Rick Lowe uses to develop community based projects on a number of levels. The lecture will will focus on the 20 development of Project Row Houses in Houston, Texas, Trans.lation: Vickery Meadow in Dallas, Texas, and Consumption: Kitchen of Corrections, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Rick Lowe is a Houston-based artist who has exhibited and worked with communities nationally and internationally. His work has appeared in the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; Museum of Contemporary Arts, Los Angeles; Neuberger Museum, Purchase, New York; Phoenix Art Museum; Kwangju Biennale, Kwangju, Korea; the Kumamoto State Museum, Kumamoto, Japan; and the Venice Architecture Biennale. He is best known for his Project Row Houses community-based art project that he started in Houston in 1993. Further community projects include the Watts House Project in Los Angeles, the Borough Project in Charleston, SC (with Suzanne Lacy and Mary Jane Jacobs), the Delray Beach Cultural Loop in Florida, and the Anyang Public Art Program 2010 in Anyang, Korea. Among Rick’s honors are the Rudy Bruner Awards in Urban Excellence, the AIA Keystone Award, the Heinz Award in the arts and humanities, the Skowhegan Governor’s Award, the Skandalaris Award for Art/Architecture, and a U.S. Artists Booth Fellowship. He has served as a Loeb Fellow at Harvard University, a Mel King Fellow at MIT, an Auburn University Breedan Scholar, and a Stanford University Haas Center Distinguished Visitor. President Barack Obama appointed Rick to the National Council on the Arts in 2013 and in 2014 he was named a MacArthur Fellow.

This inaugural A&AA Interdisciplinary Lecture is sponsored by the School of Architecture & Allied Arts, the Departments of Architecture, Art, and Landscape Architecture.

projectrowhouses.org

www.macfound.org/fellows/920/

 

Watch lecture video here